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Top The Stack

Top The Stack

2-4 players • 10 min • 7 & up

Regular price $26.00
Regular price Sale price $26.00
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Test your measurement knowledge while racing your opponents quickly yet carefully as you all build stacks from the smallest to the largest measurement at the same time. Three kinds of measurements are included in this game: U.S. standard volume and length and metric length.

Skills Focus: Measurement, Focus & Self Control

Game Includes

  • 56 U.S. Standard Volume Tiles
  • 56 U.S. Standard Length Tiles
  • 56 Metric Length Tiles
  • 2 Measurement Guides
  • 1 Storage Bag
  • 1 Rules Booklet

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How to Play

All players race to find the correct measurement and place their tiles on top of the stacks. The first player to stack all but three of their tiles wins the game!

Educational Standards

Core Standard*: None

Skills

Explore

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players explore in two ways playing Top The Stack. They need to continuously examine the stacks and turn over their own tiles to find the right one to play.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
This game requires children to explore throughout the game. Encourage children to take their time to look carefully as they turn over tiles.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Top the Stack is a good game for developing focus and self-control as children need to attend to all the stacks being created in the play area while turning over their own tiles to find the right one to play. Encourage children to take their time to look carefully as they turn over tiles.

Determine

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players need to decide which tile to play in sequence or if they can start a sequence with the lowest value tile.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
Since this is a speed game, remind players that they need to place a correct tile quickly.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
This is a good game for developing the ability to balance quick action (placing a tile) with accuracy (looking closely at your tiles to pick the correct one).

Compare

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players may compare the word on a tile (ex: Fathom) to the Measurement Guide to make sure they know where the tile fits in the sequence.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
If you notice children putting a tile in the incorrect spot, review the Measurement Guide with them. Practice putting the tiles in the correct sequence before playing the game again to make sure the children know the proper order such as a foot follows an inch.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Top the Stack is great for teaching sequencing with specific focus on volume, imperial length and metric length. If you notice children putting a tile in the incorrect spot, review the Measurement Guide with them. Practice putting the tiles in the correct sequence before playing the game again to make sure the children know the proper order such as a foot follows an inch.

Remember

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players need to remember the measurement sequences so they know which tile comes next. Players will also be faster if they remember where a desired tile is located in their field of overturned tiles.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
This game requires children to explore throughout the game. Encourage children to take their time to look carefully as they turn over tiles. To boost memory, children can say the name of their tiles as they turn them over. Combining visual and verbal elements together has been show to significantly increase short term memory versus just using visual or verbal individually.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Top the Stack is a good game for developing focus and self-control as children need to attend to the stacks being created in the play area while turning over their own tiles to find the right one to play. This means children are exploring throughout the game while under time pressure to add to a stack before another player. Encourage children to take their time to look carefully as they turn over tiles which will allow them to remember where desired tiles are located while also avoiding misplaying a tile in the incorrect sequence.

Practice

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players are practicing sequencing throughout Top the Stack game play.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
When children are first learning the game, practice putting the tiles in the correct sequence before playing to make sure they know the proper order, such as a foot follows an inch.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Top the Stack is great for teaching sequencing with specific focus on volume, length and metric length. When children are first learning the game, practice putting the tiles in the correct sequence before playing to make sure they know the proper order, such as a foot follows an inch. Teachers can also incorporate the tiles into other classroom activities to help children learn general sequencing skills as well as volume and length vocabulary and sequences.

Solve

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Because other players are racing to place their tiles to start and build stacks, the top tiles on each stack are rapidly changing. To win the game, players need to adapt to the changing stacks while using speed and memory to place all their tiles correctly before the other players.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
No special adult support is required. However, if you notice children putting a tile in the incorrect spot, review the Measurement Guide with them. Practice putting the tiles in the correct sequence before playing the game again to make sure the children know the proper order such as a foot follows an inch.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
No special adult support is required. However, if you notice children putting a tile in the incorrect spot, review the Measurement Guide with them. Practice putting the tiles in the correct sequence before playing the game again to make sure the children know the proper order such as a foot follows an inch.


*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards

Special Needs

Communication

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
The vocabulary related to measurement may be new to the child. Introduce the words and their meaning before playing the game. Words such as "fathom" and "furlong" may be unfamiliar to many players. Once everyone knows the meaning of each term, play can begin.
Top The Stack does not require communication. Also, because everyone will be concentrating on their own quick moves, most communication will probably take place between games. Encourage discussion of play and how players approached the game for group learning and bonding.

Sensorimotor

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
A stack of tiles does not need to be neatly aligned. However, if children have fine motor problems and cannot pick up and place tiles quickly, they will be at a disadvantage in Top the Stack.

Social Emotional/Behavioral

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
Children with impulsive behaviors may make quick, incorrect decisions while playing. Make sure children know that incorrect tiles will need to be taken back. Remind them to look over all tiles and refer to the Measurement Guide before choosing a tile to play.
Children who become easily frustrated and act out may find the game too challenging. Play first without the timed factor. Take turns finding a tile and placing it. Once children have successfully worked through the measurement sequence, they may be more confident to play.

Vision

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
The Measurement Tiles and Measurement Guide may be difficult for low vision players to read, thus, the game is not a good choice for them.

Hearing

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
Children with hearing impairments should not have a problem with Top The Stack as no communication is required in the game.

*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards

Autism

Top of the Stack is a speed game requiring comparison of different measurement concepts, including metric length, imperial length and volume. It is good for children who have good focus and self-control, as well as those who like sequencing or may be interested in measuring. Players pick one of the measurement categories and stack their smallest value tiles in order as quickly as possible on all the stacks in the play area. The first player with only three tiles left shouts "Top The Stack" to end the game. Players can refer to a Measurement Guide to find the size sequence from smallest value to largest.

Autism Strengths & Interests

Short Summary of Strengths & Interests

  • Understands length and volume measurement terms.
  • Can make size comparisons in sequence.
  • Can quickly shift focus from one place to another to make comparisons.

Is good at matching visual items

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Players use matching to see if the value of one of their tiles has already been placed on top of a stack. If so, the player needs to find the next value up in the sequence to play on that stack or turn their attention to other stacks.

Has a good memory for sensory details, including visual, touch, taste and smell

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Top The Stack requires children to have a good memory for the relationship of different measurements, such as an inch is shorter than a foot or a pint is less than a quart. Fortunately, the game includes a Measurement Guide allowing players to learn the meaning and relationship of each measurement, and to be a support during game play to help children determine the next measurement in a sequence.

Has a good memory for words, phrases and dialouge

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Children who have good verbal memory will hone that skill playing Top The Stack. Whether they already know the meaning of the different measurements or learn them as a result of the game, the stronger their memory for the words and sequence becomes...the greater speed they will have playing the game.

Has a good memory for pictures, numbers and patterns

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
The memory for the measurement sequence is aided by ability to remember numbers and relationships among them. Children who can visual relationships, remember numbers and see the pattern in the relationships will excel with Top the Stack.

Likes to put things in order or a sequence

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
The whole intent of Top the Stack is to sequence items in a size sequence for measurement options. Children who can sequence abstract concepts (ex: numbers, the alphabet) without concrete manipulative (ex: blocks) will do well with this game.

Learns through visualizing or "replaying" actions in their mind

This game is not appropriate

Likes activities with rules, such as math and phonics

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Understanding the relationships among components within a measurement category requires understanding rules. For example, the metric system relies on the base of 10 for calculating length. Thus, Top The Stack will likely be engaging for children who enjoy activities that follow straightforward rules and relationships.

Is very concrete and literal

This game is not appropriate

Learns in small "chunks" (for example, phone numbers are 3 chunks of number xxx-xxx-xxxx that are combined together)

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Measurements start with a specific size unit. Chunks of those units then comprise the next named measurement element, and so on. The chunking patterns help the child remember the sequence, especially for the metric system.

Is good at nonverbal reasoning and logic

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Although the child might understand all of the concepts in the game, Top The Stack requires reading words to play the game.

Likes spatial problem solving

This game is not appropriate

Can read well with good vocabulary, though may not fully comprehend content

Likes to use and has good fine motor skill

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
The game requires being able to rapidly stack small tiles, which could be a great showcase for children who enjoy using their fine motor skills.

Likes established routines or set ways of doing things

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
The game is played the same way every time. Even though the measurement category may change, the play sequence and sequencing remains the same. Thus, Top The Stack should be not be frustrating for children who prefer predictable ways to play. If the child does not like to switch categories, play the game with just one category for each play session.

Likes manipulating, constructing or building things

This game is not appropriate

Likes to use and has good musical abilities

This game is not appropriate

Likes to use and has good drawing skills

This game is not appropriate


Autism Special Considerations

Appears to ignore other's communication and/or has difficulty giving eye contact to a communication partner

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
In Top the Stack players have to concentrate on the tiles being stacked rather than other players.

Has difficulty understanding complex verbal directions

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
The directions for Top The Stack are somewhat complex, as players need to understand when to stack on their own or others' tile stack and when to start a new stack. This may be confusing to some children. For those children, practice the game by just building one stack. Then, play by building only 2 stacks, and so on until the child is comfortable with the complete game.

Uses vocabulary inaccurately or demonstrates echolalia (repeating another's speech)

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
The game requires concentration, which may reduce echolalia, as others will not be talking during play.

Gets stuck repeating a verbal topic or physical actions and/or has difficulty attending to others' actions or topic.

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Children need to be able to shift their attention from their own stacks to others' in order to see the best moves. This will not prohibit play, but may reduce the chance of winning.

Has difficulty producing speech/communication

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Communication is not needed to play, but discussion of strategy is encouraged.

Has difficulty sequencing multi-step actions and/or doing complex abstract tasks

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? No

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Measurement of volume and length in both imperial and metric approaches requires abstract thinking skills. This may be too difficult for many children with autism.

Demonstrates difficulty initiating and maintaining social interactions

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Social interaction is not needed to play, but may develop as players vie for the same stacks for their tiles.

Acts out or demonstrates avoidance behaviors when frustrated, overwhelmed, or needs more sensory input.

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? No

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Top The Stack is fast-paced and requires concentration and may not be a good match for children who are easily frustrated, distracted, or overwhelmed.

Has short attention span for non-preferred activities

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? No

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Top of the Stack is not recommended unless the child likes fast-paced, abstract math games. On the other hand, children who have a preference for math and understand measurement concepts may like this game.

Needs sameness or consistent routines and/or has difficulty with transitions from one activity to another

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
The game can shift from metric to imperial length or volume in different games. This shift may be difficult for some children. Because the games are played the same way, the adults can model how the next game is played the same way.

Provide the measurement guide to let children study the sequence.

To practice, play with children by stacking the tiles in order for each topic (metric, imperial, volume) to give them the physical feel of the process.

Has difficulty understanding others' feelings, intentions, and the reasons for others' actions.

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Players do not have to understand other players' thinking or feeling.

*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards

Extended Play

Extra Ways to Play the Game
Divide up one set of tiles with equal number and terms for each player. Players then build their own stacks following the remainder of the game rules. Whoever gets finished first wins. Make sure to check the sequence for correctness.

Materials Needed
No additional materials needed.

Developmental Benefits
The advantage of this alternative is that each pile can be checked for accuracy. With the traditional rules, when piles are finished, if a mistake was made it may not possible to know who made the error. This is a good way to start with children who are just learning the measurement sequence. They can check themselves for accuracy.

Extra Ways to Play the Game
Play Top the Stack as a memory game. Turn all tiles face down, and take turns turning up two tiles looking for matches.

Materials Needed
No additional materials needed.

Developmental Benefits
Playing Top the Stack as a memory game may be a good way to introduce the terms in the game before playing the game as the rules are written. This allows players to become familiar with the terms and discuss their meaning before the actual speed game is played.

Extra Ways to Play the Game
Rather than using one category (ex: volume), use four tiles of each type of tile (ex: pint) in two categories (ex: volume and metric length). Build stacks for each, following the rules of the game. Then play with all three categories, with four of each tile from each set.

Materials Needed
No additional materials needed.

Developmental Benefits
This expansion adds an element of mental challenge and complexity, as players are required to remember two or three categories and their sequences. This is a double or triple sequencing challenge. Players must recall which measurement category is represented by a tile that is turned over as well as the place that tile fills in the sequence.

*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards