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Cross Lanes

Cross Lanes

2-4 players • 20 min • 6 & up

Regular price $14.00
Regular price Sale price $14.00
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Up one, down one. Strike and spare. Be the first player to run out of cards in this game that challenges your sequencing skills.

Skills Focus: Sequencing, Planning

Game Includes

  • 54 Cross Lanes Cards
  • 1 Rules Booklet

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How to Play

Place cards from your hand onto the existing play area. Place your card on two cards at once for a strike or a spare, which makes your opponents draw a card. The first person to play all their cards is the winner!

Educational Standards

Core Standard*: Math

Math
Counting and Cardinality
Compare Numbers                                                                              Grade Level K

Skills

Explore

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players need to examine game area as play progresses to find options on the board for most points.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
Parents can help children closely examine the orientation of the cards to look for spare and strike opportunities. Also, encourage children to rotate the cards in their hands to help them look for different options. Also suggest that children look at all of their options, rather than settle on the first one they see.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Educators can help children closely examine the orientation of the cards to look for spare and strike opportunities. Also, encourage children to rotate the cards in their hands to help them look for different options. Children may be tempted to place a card in the first location they see. Remind them of the goal of the game and to look for their best option.

Determine

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players need to determine whether they can play a card regularly, or for a spare or for a strike.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
Determining which card to play requires identifying locations where at least one of the numbers on the card is one more or less than a card on the table. Simultaneously, children need to determine if they can play the card at a 90 degree angle or for a spare or strike. Encourage children to rotate their card to help visualize options for playing regularly or finding a spare or strike.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Determining which card to play requires identifying locations where at least one of the numbers on the card is one more or less than a card on the table. Simultaneously, children need to determine if they can play the card at a 90 degree angle or for a spare or strike. Encourage children to rotate their card to help visualize options for playing regularly or finding a spare or strike. Remind children to look at the layout in relation to both ends of their cards.

>Compare

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Comparing is the primary thinking skill used by players in Cross Lanes as they compare the cards in their hands with those on the game area as they look for possible card placement options.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
To help children when learning, encourage them to rotate the cards in their hands; and ask them why the chose one card over another. Understanding children's reasoning can help parents provide guidance and ideas for how to play different cards on future turns.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Cross Lanes is good for developing flexible thinking skills because children need to consider multiple variables, namely, card orientation, number matching (plus or minus 1) and options for making spares or strikes. Also, comparing and contrasting involves simple addition and subtraction, and evaluation of potential scoring options. To help children when learning, encourage them to rotate the cards in their hands; and ask them why the chose one card over another. Understanding children's reasoning can help educators provide guidance.

Plan

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players can try to plan for future moves, but need to react to the cards played by opponents. Players have the most control over planning when trying to sequence their cards for the Final Frame in order to play as many cards as possible.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
Thinking about future moves can help children win the game. Parents can remind children to think about what could happen next if they play a certain card so children will plan accordingly. This type of long-term, sequential thinking is important well beyond game play. When children are first learning Cross Lanes, play a few games with all player's hands visible. This way, the children can see how the parent considers different moves, and the parent can give the children hints or ask them questions to help them make the optimal choice.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Cross Lanes is a good game for helping children develop organizational skills as they plan moves, and adaptive skills as they creatively respond to moves of opponents. Organizing is essential to effective planning and is an important executive functioning skill. Thinking about future moves can help children win the game. Educators can remind children to think about what could happen next if they play a certain card so children will plan accordingly. This type of long-term, sequential thinking is important well beyond game play.

Solve

What Does Child Do To Use Skill In The Game?
Players use their solving skills for an element of Cross Lanes, namely, making spares and strikes.

How Parents Can Assist Learning
Encourage children to take each card in their hand and hold it over the game area, looking for ways to make spares or strikes.

Learning Implications and Educator Support
Cross Lanes helps children develop spatial visualization skills as they imagine how to orient their cards in a way to make a spare or strike. As children are learning this skill, encourage them to take each card in their hand and hold it over the game area, looking for ways to make spares or strikes. The more proficient they become, the more they will be able to visualize the solution mentally, without holding a card over the game area. The game also encourages children to consider two different problems at the same time, when looking for placement for a spare or strike. This is a foundation for solving problems with multiple operations.


*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards

Special Needs

Cognitive

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
Eliminate strike and spare to make the game easier.
Match numbers (ex: 8 to 8) instead of matching based on moving up or down by one prior to matching (ex: 8 to 9). This simplifies the game.
Try playing where cards can be placed in a straight line as well as at 90 degree angles. This makes it easier to play the game.

Communication

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
Communication is not needed. Language can be encouraged by asking children to explain why the card works in a specific spot.

Sensorimotor

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
Not recommended for children with difficulty with fine motor control because Cross Lanes requires accurate placement of cards.

Social Emotional/Behavioral

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
No modifications needed.

Vision

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
Not recommended for children with vision problems.

Hearing

Suggestions for How to Modify Play Experience
No modifications needed.

*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards

Autism

Cross Lanes is a good card game for children who like to make patterns and can see different spatial and number options. A player selects a card from his hand that has a number that is one higher or lower than a number on a card on the table. This card is placed at a 90° angle across one or two cards on the play area to score points. This requires analyzing the numbers on the players' cards, as well as the numbers and orientation of cards on the play area.

Autism Strengths & Interests

Short Summary of Strengths & Interests

  • Likes numbers and can count forward to and backwards from 9
  • Has good ability to scan visual images to find information such as numbers
  • Enjoys spatial reasoning

Is good at matching visual items

This game is not appropriate

Has a good memory for sensory details, including visual, touch, taste and smell

This game is not appropriate

Has a good memory for words, phrases and dialouge

This game is not appropriate

Has a good memory for pictures, numbers and patterns

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Cross Lanes is a good game for practicing visual memory skills as players need to look for and remember number combinations and card orientation on the play area. Children who are good with pattern recognition and enjoy playing with numbers will likely enjoy playing Cross Lanes.

Likes to put things in order or a sequence

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Many children with autism like to place objects in a sequence. Those children can use that skill to do well at Cross Lanes. On every turn, players are looking to place cards numerically one higher or lower than cards on the play area. Thus sequencing knowledge is an essential feature of playing Cross Lanes.

Learns through visualizing or "replaying" actions in their mind

This game is not appropriate

Likes activities with rules, such as math and phonics

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Some children with autism enjoy activities that have clear rules for guiding their experience. Because Cross Lanes is based on number sequencing, it is good for children like this who like math.

Is very concrete and literal

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

This game is not appropriate

Learns in small "chunks" (for example, phone numbers are 3 chunks of number xxx-xxx-xxxx that are combined together)

This game is not appropriate

Is good at nonverbal reasoning and logic

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Cross Lanes does not require verbalization. Children, who are good at problem-solving and logical analysis, yet are uncomfortable talking about their thoughts or reasoning may enjoy the game.

Likes spatial problem solving

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Many children with autism are good at thinking in three dimensions and solving problems using spatial orientation. Those children can build that strength with Cross Lanes as they look for the best orientation of a card to score the most points.

Can read well with good vocabulary, though may not fully comprehend content

This game is not appropriate

Likes to use and has good fine motor skill

Is This Game Appropriate? Yes

Description
Some children enjoy playing with and manipulating small objects such as cards. Cross Lanes involves the ability to place cards with good precision on top of other cards, so children with good dexterity can hone that skill with Cross Lanes.

Likes established routines or set ways of doing things

This game is not appropriate

Likes manipulating, constructing or building things

This game is not appropriate

Likes to use and has good musical abilities

This game is not appropriate

Likes to use and has good drawing skills

This game is not appropriate


Autism Special Considerations

Has difficulty understanding complex verbal directions

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? No

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Directions for spares and strikes are difficult to understand. Children will need multiple demonstrations. It may be easier for children with special needs to eliminate the spare and strike rules.

Uses vocabulary inaccurately or demonstrates echolalia (repeating another's speech)

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Cross Lanes does not require talking. If children demonstrate echolalia, model a phrase that if repeated fits with the game. For example, "Find a card with one more or one less."

Gets stuck repeating a verbal topic or physical actions and/or has difficulty attending to others' actions or topic.

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Try to change the child's topic to the game. Bring attention to what is happening when it is not the child's turn. For instance, hold the card to be played up for the child to see and say, "Look what I am going to play. Can you think where I will put it?" This will help pull the child into the play of others.

Has difficulty producing speech/communication

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Communication is not necessary, but should be encouraged. Ask the child to explain why they put there card in a specific spot. "Which number is one more?"

Has difficulty sequencing multi-step actions and/or doing complex abstract tasks

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Understanding spares and strikes many be too complex for some children. If this is the case, spares and strikes could be omitted.

Demonstrates difficulty initiating and maintaining social interactions

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Children may need to be reminded that it is their turn. Social interchange can be encouraged by having the child with special needs be the "turn announcer." They point to and announce whose turn it is after each play. This encourages the child pay attention and participate.

Acts out or demonstrates avoidance behaviors when frustrated, overwhelmed, or needs more sensory input.

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? No

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Reduce extraneous noise.
A weighted vest worn during the game may provide additional pressure input and thus reduce fidgeting due to sensory needs. Pressure can be calming when used for no more than 20 minutes at a time.
Practice a phrase to ask for help and role play situations in the game where it is needed.
Provide techniques for self-calming, such as holding a special toy.
Allow time for movement. For example, a child who needs to move frequently can be given an opportunity to 'celebrate' their turn by running around the table or jumping up and down 10 times.

Has short attention span for non-preferred activities

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
If the child cannot attend for the whole deck of cards, reduce the size of the deck. This will shorten the game.

Needs sameness or consistent routines and/or has difficulty with transitions from one activity to another

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
The game is played the same way with each move, so this will feel comfortable for children with this characteristic. Omit the strike and spare if this is too difficult a shift.
Play games at the same time every day, so the child anticipates the game routine.
Change the location of the game, so the child may play in different rooms, at the table, or on the floor. This will build tolerance for variation.
Prepare the child ahead time for the introduction of a new game. Talk about aspects that will be motivating for the child, and let them explore the parts of the game before setting out the whole game.
Involve the child verbally and with actions for the transition to the game table or at the end of game play. For example, you might say, "Here's a rubber duck. Let's find where it goes?"

Has difficulty understanding others' feelings, intentions, and the reasons for others' actions.

Is This Game Appropriate for Child with Characteristic? Yes

Can Child with Characteristic Play Game w/o Modification? Yes

Strategies for Developing Compensatory Skills:
Understanding what others' think or feel is not needed, but should be encouraged. "Wow! He got a strike! Tell him 'Way to go!'

*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards

Extended Play

Extra Ways to Play the Game
We refer to this variation as How Many Ways Can You Make a Number? Deal out 7 cards. When it is a player's turn, they ask another player for cards that total one of the cards in his or her hand. That player then gives the asking player all the cards that total that amount. It can be one or more cards. For example, a player with a card that has an 8 & 2 asks another player for a 10. If they have it, the other player can give a card with a 7 and 3 on it, or two cards that have a 1 & 4 and a 2 & 3 on them. Cards given away are redrawn from the draw pile. The goal of the game is to get rid of all their cards first. This encourages children to try numerous ways to add up the numbers on their cards. The game ends when all cards in the deck are gone.

Materials Needed
No additional materials

Developmental Benefits
This expansion give children practice in how to add different amounts to get the same number.

Extra Ways to Play the Game
Play the game where you are matching based on one point more or less than the card on the table. However, in this variation, the difference is in the alignment. Cards are not placed on top of each other. Rather, cards can be connected end-to-end for one point; and side-by-side for 2 points. If you can place a card with 3 or more sides aligned to two cards on the table, that is worth 4 points. This would occur in rare instances.

Materials Needed
No extra materials needed.

Developmental Benefits
This variation allows players to think about placement of cards in a different way.

*Data compiled from CCSSI ELA Standards, WA Science Standards, and Washington Social Studies Standards